puzzle-685283_edited.jpg
DataSense_logo.jpg

DataSense LLC
Making Sense of Your Data

Professional Support for Qualitative Researchers and Graduate Students in All Disciplines

Blue Surface
Blue Surface
Blue Surface

My Social Change Interests (Best viewed on Desktop Site)

Karen Conger - Endangered Wildlife Paintings

My endangered wildlife paintings are included in a special category to provide updated information about the protective support that is currently underway by major wildlife conservation partners.

“Never underestimate what a few committed individuals can do for a threatened species.”
— Wildlife Conservation Network

Image by Chandan Chaurasia

Snow Leopard - Silent Guardian

Soft Pastel

Snow Leopard - Silent Guardian.jpg

The snow leopard is unable to roar but puffing, hissing, growling, screaming, yowling, moaning, and even purring are enough for this elusive and mysterious cat. The strikingly beautiful but endangered snow leopard remains one of the world’s most mysterious cats. Rarely sighted, it inhabits the high mountains of Central Asia over an expansive twelve-country range. CITES is the United Nations Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. CITES bans or strictly limits trade of animals or their body parts. Since 1975, the snow leopard has been listed by CITES in Appendix I, which includes species that are threatened with extinction. This means it is illegal to internationally trade in snow leopards or their body parts. IUCN classifies the snow leopard as vulnerable. Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about the snow leopard can be found on the official websites of Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN), Snow Leopard Conservancy, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Foggy Lake

Digital Pen

California Mountain Lion - "Night Vigil"

CA Mountain Lion 'Night Vigil'_edited.jpg

The scientific name for the mountain lion is Puma concolor. They are also known as puma, cougar, catamount or panther. It is considered the largest species of wild cat in North America and second heaviest after the Jaguar. Although they are of a larger size, they share a closer resemblance to the smaller felines in terms of physical features and are therefore not considered to be part of the big cat family. There are 32 subspecies of mountain lions including the North American cougar, Argentine cougar, and Southern South American cougar. A mountain lion has a round head with erect ears, powerful jaws, and retractable claws. They are the fourth largest wild cat species in the world, standing up to 90 cm tall and having a length of around 8 ft. Males tend to weigh around 180 lbs while females weigh around 110 pounds. Despite their size, they are incredibly agile and slender creatures. Compared to big cats, mountain lions do not usually ‘roar’. They have minimal communicative noises, usually resorting to hisses, growls, and purrs which give them more similarity to a house cat. Coexisting with mountain lions - they are not endangered but they are protected in California. The California Wildlife Protection Act of 1990 (Proposition 117) legally classified mountain lions as a "specially protected mammal". It is unlawful to take, injure, possess, transport, import, or sell any mountain lion or any part or product thereof. This status and other statutes prohibit the Department from developing hunting season or take limits for lions. The act established certain exemptions from that prohibition. Mountain lions may be killed only 1) if a depredation permit is issued to take a specific lion that has killed livestock or pets; 2) to preserve public safety; or 3) to protect listed bighorn sheep. Mountain lion attacks on humans are uncommon. Statistically speaking, a person is one thousand times more likely to be struck by lightning than attacked by a mountain lion. Since 1890, there have been few verified mountain lion attacks on humans in California, six of them fatal. In most cases, the person was alone when the attack occurred. The last documented human-lion attack occurred June 2020 in San Diego County. Under the CDFW's Public Safety Wildlife Guidelines, an animal is deemed to be a public safety threat if there is “a likelihood of human injury based on the totality of the circumstances.” Factors that are considered include the lion's behavior and its proximity to schools, playgrounds and other public gathering places. The determination of whether an animal is a public safety threat is made by the CDFW or local law enforcement personnel on the scene. If a wild animal is declared a public safety threat, protecting human health and safety is a priority. People who live in mountain lion habitat can take precautions to reduce their risk of encountering a mountain lion. By deer-proofing the landscape, homeowners can avoid attracting a lion's main food source. Removing dense vegetation from around the home and installing outdoor lighting will make it difficult for mountain lions to approach unseen. Human-wildlife conflicts with mountain lions have become increasingly common as more people move into mountain lion habitat. Mountain lions primarily eat deer and other wildlife, but if allowed, they will prey on vulnerable pets and livestock. The Department received hundreds of reports annually of mountain lions harming or killing livestock and pets. Many options and resources exist to reduce conflicts with these beautiful wild animals. Trim brush to reduce hiding places for mountain lions. Install motion-sensitive lighting around the house and other structures. Provide sturdy, covered shelters for sheep, goats, and other vulnerable animals. Do not allow pets outside unattended when mountain lions are most active—dawn, dusk, and at night. Bring pet food inside to avoid attracting raccoons, opossums and other potential mountain lion prey. IUCN “Red List of Threatened Species” list the mountain lion as least concern with a decreasing population. Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about the mountain lion (puma, cougar) can be found on many official websites including factsking.com, wildlife.ca.gov, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Image by Pavel Neznanov

Amur Leopard - Elusive Power

Digital Pen

Stealthy, nimble, solitary. Strong and fearsome. Speeds up to 37 mph, Leaps 19’ horizontally and 10’ vertically. Hunting at night and never giving up the fight. Pound for pound, the leopard is the strongest climber of all the big cats. Their shoulder blades even have special attachment sites for stronger climbing muscles. They spend much of their time in trees even when stalking prey and for eating. Both lions and hyenas will take away a leopard’s food if they can. To prevent this, they will often store their kill high up in tree branches where it can feed in relative safety. They are cunning, opportunistic hunters. AWF and the IUCN “Red List of Threatened Species” list the leopard species as vulnerable with a decreasing population of fewer than 100 individuals. The primary threat to the leopard is human activity. Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about the Amur leopard can be found on many official websites including World Wildlife Fund (WWF), African Wildlife Foundation (AWF), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Amur Leopard - Elusive Power.jpg
Image by Hana El Zohiry
African Lion Cub - Born with Spots.jpg

African Lion Cub - Born with Spots

Soft Pastel

African lion cubs are born with spots and bright blue eyes. The leopard-like spots eventually disappear as they grow older and their eyes eventually change to a permanent golden hue. Lionesses in a pride often have cubs around the same time as each other. They look after them in a group, known as a ‘crèche’. This helps to keep them safe from predators – meat-eating animals, such as other lions and tigers – and also large animals such as elephant and buffalo. They remain hidden for one to two months before being introduced to the rest of the pride. Are lion cubs dangerous? Yes. They are wild animals. IUCN classifies the African lion as vulnerable. Reference photo for this artwork is from pixabay.com. Information about African lions can be found on the official websites of Life Science; Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN) and conservation partners in Kenya and Mozambique; and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Image by Shaswot Bhandari

African Lion - Sunday Afternoon

Soft Pastel

This was a really good hair day for this young African lion. Conservation partners in Kenya and Mozambique are playing a large role in teaching lions and people to coexist. With less than 2,000 lions left in the whole of Kenya, the region serves as an important habitat for the big cats. When lions kill and eat livestock, herders often retaliate with guns, spears or poison. Confined to parks, the lion population dwindled and was on the brink of disappearing in 2007 with only 11 lions found in protected areas. Ewaso Lions is working with communities to reverse this trend, creating one of the few places in Africa where lions exist outside protected areas, allowing community lands to once again serve as an important habitat for big cats. The area population has increased to over 50 lions making permanent residence in community lands. A growing human population of 60,000 in Niassa that needs food and income poses challenges to the reserve’s 800 lions. With few opportunities for education and employment, many families rely on the use of natural resources—particularly fish, skins, ivory, and bushmeat—to support their subsistence lifestyles. The greatest threat to lions in Niassa comes from snares that are set to capture bushmeat and a growing trade in lion skins, claws, and teeth. IUCN classifies the African lion as vulnerable. Reference photo for this artwork is from pixabay.com. Information about African lions can be found on the official websites of Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN), WildAid, Ewasso Lions, Niassa Lion Project (NLP), Lion Recovery Fund (LRF), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

African Lion - Sunday Afternoon.jpg
Image by Damian Patkowski
Cheetah Cubs - Your Cheetah Eyes.jpg

Cheetah Cubs - Your Cheetah Eyes

Digital Pen

African lion cubs are born with spots and bright blue eyes. The leopard-like spots eventually disappear as they grow older and their eyes eventually change to a permanent golden hue. Lionesses in a pride often have cubs around the same time as each other. They look after them in a group, known as a ‘crèche’. This helps to keep them safe from predators – meat-eating animals, such as other lions and tigers – and also large animals such as elephant and buffalo. They remain hidden for one to two months before being introduced to the rest of the pride. Are lion cubs dangerous? Yes. They are wild animals. IUCN classifies the African lion as vulnerable. Reference photo for this artwork is from pixabay.com. Information about African lions can be found on the official websites of Life Science; Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN) and conservation partners in Kenya and Mozambique; and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Gradient

Przewalski's Horse - Faces the Storm

Soft Pastel

Przewalski’s horses (Equus ferus przewalskii), a critically endangered species from Mongolia, is considered to be the last truly wild horse in existence. The Przewalski’s Horse has a special physique and one can easily see the differences to a domestic horse. Normally Przewalski’s Horses do not have a withers of more than 147 cm. Additionally their strong bones and the thick neck let them appear tough and robust. Characteristical, they have an eel-colored back and a special coat with colors like grey-yellow or red-brown. The impression of a tough little wild horse becomes completed through the dark tail and mane as well as the massive and big head. The Przewalski’s Horse gets its name from the Russian explorer Nikolai Przhevalsky. Nikolai Przhevalsky was the first to describe the przewalski’s horse as he found a skeleton of the horse during his expedition in 1881. The name Przewalski is of polish origin and is pronounced as she-val-skee. The horse is also known as the Dzungarian horse or Asiatic wild horse. It is famous as the takhi horse amongst locals of Mongolia. The tough little horse has sharp hooves and a strong kick that can be deadly for any predator. Normally, the Przewalski’s Horse makes use of its sharp hooves to dig in the ground in search for water. Przewalski’s horses nearly became extinct in the wild in 1969, leading conservation scientists around the world to begin breeding programs of captive P horses in the hope of saving the species. The captive-bred individuals were reintroduced to the wild in the 1990s and, today, several healthy herds can be seen roaming the steppes of central Asia. The Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences’ (CVMBS) Winnie Carter Wildlife Center (WCWC) is the new home for two Przewalski’s horses (P horses). At the WCWC, the P horses will help teach veterinary and undergraduate students about exotic animal care and the importance of species conservation. The 8- and 9-year-old P horses were born at San Diego Safari Park and, because their genetics were already well-represented in the park’s P horse population, they were sent to Fossil Rim Wildlife Center in Glen Rose, Texas. Though the P horses were raised in captivity, they had little direct contact with humans and maintain the shy personality they share with their wild cousins. IUCN classifies Przewalski horses as endangered. Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about Pzrewalski's Horse is from several websites including AboutAnimals.com; Smithsonian National Zoo; Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences; and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Przewalski's  Horse -  Faces the Storm.jpg
Masai Mara National Reserve Kenya

Grevy's Zebra Mother and Foal

Digital Pen

Grevy's Zebra Mother and Foal.jpg

Grevy’s zebra foals are born all legs and ears. Ears standing to full attention, neck arched, muscles tensed, nearly 1000 lbs of alert zebra ready for action. Watch a Grevy’s zebra adult male presiding over his territory and one begins to understand the majesty of this species. Indeed in 1882, Menelik II, Emperor of Abyssinia (now Ethiopia), thought the zebra was so regal that he presented one as a gift to the President of France, Jules Grévy. And so the name Grevy’s zebra was coined. The Grevy’s is quickly distinguishable from its plains and mountain zebra counterparts due to its charming large round ears, and because it is tailor-made for the semi-arid climate where it lives. This zebra can survive for five days without water. The plains of Africa are filled with zebras, their distinctive coats forming a sea of black and white across the continent’s landscapes. But in dry northern Kenya the unique Grevy’s zebra makes its home, and less than 2,500 of these special animals remain. IUCN classifies Grevy's zebra as endangered. Reference photo for this artwork is from WCN/GZT. Information about Grevy's zebras can be found on the official websites of Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN), Grevy's Zebra Trust (GZT), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Image by Ant Rozetsky

Amur Siberian Tiger _
Territorial - I'm Watching You

Digital Pen

They roar, rumble, and purr. The Amur (Siberian) tiger is the biggest tiger of the tiger species and is the only subspecies of tiger that has learned to live in the snow. They have the longest fur of the tigers and they need it. Adult male tigers are at the top of the food chain. They hunt alone and can run while holding a 100-kilogram (220-pounds) prey in their mouths, reaching speeds up to 50-mph. In 2010, the 13 tiger range countries committed to TX2—to double wild tiger numbers by 2022, the next Year of the Tiger. In pursuing TX2, WWF and its partners have taken a comprehensive approach to tiger conservation. Achieving TX2 requires expanding support for site-based programs across priority landscapes and ensuring key populations endure long after the TX2 goal is met. Global Tiger Day is observed on July 29th to reinforce concern and to inform of the ecological role of the Siberian Tiger. IUCN classifies the Amur tiger as endangered. Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about the Amur Siberian tiger can be found on the official websites of Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN), World Wildlife Fund (WWF), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Amur (Siberian) Tiger - Territorial (I'm watching you).jpg
Herd of Giraffes

Giraffa Camelopardalis – Tallest of All

Giraffa Camelopardalis - Tallest of All.jpg

Digital Pen

The Nubian giraffe, scientific name Giraffa Camelopardalis, is the tallest living animal in the world. It is three-horned, measures up to 19 feet tall, and weighs up to two tons. The Nubian giraffe population is down 98 percent and lives only on protected lands in Kenya. According to the IUCN, this subspecies is “critically endangered,” which means they face an “extremely high risk” of extinction in the wild. World Giraffe Day (WGD) is an exciting annual event initiated by Giraffe Conservation Foundation to celebrate the tallest animal on the longest day or night (depending on which hemisphere you live!) of the year – 21 June – every year! Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about the Nubian giraffe (Giraffa Camelopardalis) can be found on the official websites of Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN), the Giraffe Conservation Foundation (GCF), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Dark-Background

Okapi - Velvet Ghost of the Forest

Digital Pen

Okapi - Velvet Ghost of the Forest.jpg

Stripes like a zebra, the body of a horse, and a head like a giraffe ... The okapi is one of the oldest and most distinctive mammals left on earth. The quiet, beautiful and enigmatic animal has only been known to Western scientists since 1901 due to its secretive and reclusive nature. However, the local people in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the only country where the okapi is found, have known about the animal for thousands of years. Though this endangered giraffe relative is a culturally respected animal and has been protected in the country since 1933, slash-and-burn agriculture, illegal gold mining and bushmeat poaching threaten its existence. For over 30 years, the Okapi Conservation Project has never faltered in its ability to withstand civil wars, rebel attacks and insecurity in an area ripe with political strife and uncertainty. It’s this standing loyalty that OCP has developed a strong trust within the community, allowing their conservation programs to thrive and expand under arduous conditions. Throughout DRC’s turmoil, the Okapi Conservation Project has remained the primary supporter of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve and protector of okapi. Okapis are more commonly known as the "forest giraffe" and they are the only living relatives of giraffes. The okapi and giraffe share a number of common features - elongated necks; long, dark tongues; and gaited walks where each mammal steps with the same front and hind leg on eah side rather than moving alternate legs like other ungulates (hoofed animals). Okapis weigh between 440-770 lbs, and have a very thick skin covered with a velvety fur coat, covered with only body hair, which repels water. The hind quarters and tops of their legs are covered with black and white stripes. The ankles are white and have a dark spot above each cloven hoof. Shy and usually solitary, okapis are nearly impossible to observe in the wild. Their large ears detect predatory disturbances, while the distinguishing brown and white marks on their rump act as camouflage in the forest. To avoid leopards, they stay in one place on a 'nest' for the first six to nine weeks of their life, which is much longer than calves of other species are known to do. Okapi mothers produce infrasonic calls at around 14HZ to communicate with their calves, which is useful in dense forest and cannot be heard by humans. IUCN classifies the Okapi as endangered. Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about the Okapi can be found on the official websites of WCN (wildnet.org); AfricaGeographic.com; and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Image by NOAA

Polar Bear - Snow Warm

Soft Pastel

Polar Bear - Snow Warm.jpg

The largest bear in the world and the Arctic's top predator, polar bears are a powerful symbol of the strength and endurance of the Arctic. The polar bear's Latin name, Ursus maritimus, means "sea bear." It's an apt name for this majestic species, which spends much of its life in, around, or on the ocean–predominantly on the sea ice. In the United States, Alaska is home to two polar bear subpopulations. Considered talented swimmers, polar bears can sustain a pace of six miles per hour by paddling with their front paws and holding their hind legs flat like a rudder. They have a thick layer of body fat and a water-repellent coat that insulates them from the cold air and water. Polar bears spend over 50% of their time hunting for food. A polar bear might catch only one or two out of 10 seals it hunts, depending on the time of year and other variables. Their diet mainly consists of ringed and bearded seals because they need large amounts of fat to survive. Fun Facts: 40kph: The polar bear's top speed 42 razor sharp teeth: With jagged back teeth and canines larger than grizzly teeth, they pack quite the bite 30 cm wide paws: The size of a dinner plate! A natural snowshoe that helps the bear trek across treacherous ice and deep snow 3 eyelids: The third helps protect the bear's eyes from the elements 4 inches of fat: Under the bear's skin to keep it warm Black skin Transparent fur Blue tongue Are Polar Bears Endangered? The IUCN Polar Bear Specialist Group lists the polar bear as a vulnerable species, citing sea ice loss from climate change as the single biggest threat to their survival. The most recent study cited on IUCN estimates there are currently about 23,000 polar bears worldwide. Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about the polar bear can be found on the websites of World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), Polar Bears International, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Image by Adam Excell

Arctic Fox - Whiteout

Soft Pastel

Arctic Fox - Whiteout.jpg

His tail is wrapped around him – very dim in the snow. The Arctic fox can survive frigid Arctic temperatures as low as -58 degrees F in the treeless lands where it makes its home. Its furry soles, short ears, and short muzzle also help it adapt to the cold climate. The fox's thick tail aids its balance and is especially useful as warm cover in cold weather. In a blizzard, it may tunnel into the snow to seek shelter. It has a beautiful white (sometimes blue-gray) coat that acts as very effective winter camouflage, allowing the animal to blend into the tundra's snow and ice. When the seasons change, the coat turns brown or gray offering cover among the summer tundra's rock and plants. In winter, prey can be very scarce on the ground and arctic foxes will follow the region's premier predator - a polar bear - to eat leftover scraps from its kills. Foxes will also eat vegetables when they are available. UN.Habitat.org categorizes the Arctic Fox as critically endangered. IUCRedList.org considers them least concern and needing protection. An action plan has been developed for Arctic Foxes in Sweden (Elmhagen 2008) and status reports have been published for Norway (Ulvund et al. 2013) and Finland (Kaikusalo et al. 2000). In Sweden, Norway and Finland, a conservation project led to significant increases in the population (Angerbjörn et al. 2013). Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about the Arctic fox can be found on the official websites of National Geographic, un-habitat.org, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Silhouette of Elephant

African Elephant - Morning Call

Soft Pastel, Colored Pencil

African Elephant - Morning Call.jpg

The African savannah elephant (also called African bush elephant) is the largest animal walking the Earth. Adult males grow up to 13 feet tall at the shoulder and weigh up to 11 tons; adult females weigh half of that. Their herds wander through 37 countries in Africa. Their lifespan is up to 70 years - longer than any other mammal except humans. They are surprisingly nimble and can run up to 40 mph which is faster than any human! Elephants are among the world’s most intelligent, sensitive and social animals, possessing both empathy and family values. They live in close family groups that over the years have been torn apart by an epidemic of poaching across Africa that is fueled by a growing demand for ivory. Tens of thousands of African elephants continue to be killed each year for their tusks. There are three species of elephants - African savannah (or bush), African forest, and Asian. The Asian elephants have smaller ears than the African elephants. IUCN classifies the African elephant as vulnerable. Reference photo for this artwork is from pixabay.com. Information about African elephants can be found on the official websites of Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN), WildAid, Nature Conservancy, World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Elephants for Africa, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Forest Trees

Giant Panda Panache

Soft Pastel, Colored Pencil, Ink

The title could also be "Munch, Munch, Munch." Wild pandas live only in remote, mountainous regions in central China. They are found in dense bamboo and coniferous forests at altitudes of 5,000 to 10,000 feet. Driven nearly to extinction by habitat loss and poaching, these individuals are among the rarest in the world, with only an estimated 1,800 remaining in the wild. Low reproductive rates make them more vulnerable to threats and extinction. Improved conservation efforts and better survey methods show an increase in the wild panda population. Hundreds more pandas live in breeding centers and zoos, where they are always among the most popular attractions. Much of what we know about pandas comes from studying these zoo animals, because their wild cousins are so rare and elusive. IUCN lists the giant panda as endangered. Reference photo for this artwork is from pixabay.com. Information about the giant panda can be found on the official websites of National Geographic, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Giant Panda Panache.jpg
Night Sky

Black Jaguar Mother & Cub - Insight

Digital Pen

Black Jaguar Mother and Cub - Insight.jpg

The name Jaguar comes from the ancient Indian name “yaguar” which meant “the killer which overcomes its prey in a single bound.” If a black jaguar has a target animal 'in sight', that animal will probably not get away. That is the 'insight' which inspired the name of my painting. Black jaguars are sometimes misidentified as black panthers, which are not actually a species but a term popularly used for melanistic leopards and jaguars which have dark pigmentation. Both black big cats are part of the genus Panthera but leopards are found in Africa and Asia while jaguars are found in the Americas. A rare variant within the jaguar species, it’s estimated only 11 per cent of jaguars have this dark colouration. But while the black jaguar may appear to be all black, it has spots like other jaguars called “rosettes.” Jaguars are the third largest cat in the world — after the tiger and lion — and the biggest in the Americas. They can grow up to 170cm long, not including their impressive tails, and males can weigh up to 200 pounds. Their size can vary a lot between regions depending on the size of the local prey. They can kill just about any type of prey they encounter but prefer large animals such as capybaras, alligators, deer and armadillos.Unlike many other cats, jaguars do not avoid water; in fact, they’re quite good swimmers. Deforestation and poaching are just a couple of the threats contributing to their decline. The black jaguar’s range once spanned from the southern United States down to the tip of South America, but they have been virtually eliminated from half of their historic range. The average life span of the Jaguar in the wild is 15 years. This is one of the highest rates of all felines. They are able to live up to 20 years with the right conditions in captivity. Jaguar populations are listed as Near Threatened by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Reference photos for this artwork are licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about Black Jaguars can be found on the official websites of Big Cat Rescue, Feline Worlds, World Wildlife Fund (WWF), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Image by Timothy K

Pygmy Raccoon - Tiny Carnivore

Soft Pastel

These small masked raccoons with the big black eyes are tiny carnivores with adult males weighing less than four kilograms. The IUCN lists this species of raccoon (procyon pygmaeus) as critically endangered, with a declining population of fewer than 200 individuals in 2016. The pygmy raccoon faces four main challenges to survival: • They live only on one part of one small island in Central America and thus have only limited habitat • There is no escape for them from the impacts of habitat loss to human development for the tourism industry and sea level rise due to climate change • They are susceptible to diseases brought there by invasive species • They fall prey to non-native predators, from domestic cats to boa constrictors The pygmy raccoon is officially protected, but there isn't much outside of that label being done to help them, including laws protecting them. Ideas for conservation have included preserving the mangrove and semi-evergreen forests in which the pygmy raccoons live, halting development in the area and making it off-limits to any new development. Captive breeding is also a possibility, if there are conservation zoos willing to take on the expense. And of course, removing non-native disease-carrying predators like feral cats would be a huge benefit to the species. IUCN classifies the Pygmy Raccoon as critically endangered. Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock. Information about Pygmy Raccoons can be found on the official websites of animaldiversity.org; treehugger.com; and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Pygmy Raccoon - Tiny Carnivore.jpg
Image by Raimond Klavins
Bengal Tiger - White Tiger Blues.jpg

Bengal Tiger - White Tiger Blues

Colored Pencil, Ink

White tigers are Bengal tigers. They’re not albino or their own separate species, as many people think. A White Bengal tiger cub can only be born when both parents carry the unusual gene for white colouring. The double recessive allele (a viable DNA coding that occupies a given position on a chromosome) in the genetic code only turns up naturally about once in every 10,000 births. For unexplained reasons it seems to occur only in the Bengal subspecies. Due to the small size of the gene pool, many White Bengal tigers suffer from health problems due to inbreeding. For this reason, responsible zoos refuse to breed two White Bengal tigers together. Bengal tigers are found in Asia, including the Himalayas. They are the most common tiger and number about half of all wild tigers. Tigers use their distinctive coats as camouflage (no two have exactly the same stripes). Females give birth to litters of two to six cubs, which they raise with little or no help from the male. Cubs cannot hunt until they are 18 months old and remain with their mothers for two to three years, when they disperse to find their own territory. IUCN “Red List of Threatened Species” list the Bengal tiger species as endangered. Reference photo for this artwork is from pixabay.com. Information about Bengal tigers can be found on the official websites of National Geographic, WildAid, Wildcat Sanctuary, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Copyright Images and Content 2022. Karen Conger, Artist. DataSense LLC. All Rights Reserved.
The background photographs behind my paintings were approved for use through the Wix.com Website Platform.

Artist’s Disclaimer

Endangered wildlife descriptions are from the official websites shown in the details for each image. These external links are provided for your convenience and I do not receive any remuneration or other form of compensation for the endangered species art I produce and highlight on my fine art website. I personally donate to some of these organizations but I am not endorsing any of them and I am not responsible or liable for any information provided by their websites or your use of their websites. Any fees associated with the user's participation in these sites are the sole responsibility of the user. Views or opinions expressed on their sites do not necessarily reflect my opinion and I am not responsible or liable for the content on their sites. Users should take appropriate precautions to minimize risks from viruses, Trojan horses, worms, or other forms of malware. Users should also familiarize themselves with the external websites’ privacy policies and other terms of use, including any collection or use of personally identifiable information. Thank you.